The Ranting Kraut

19.3.2006 – 27.9.2010

Archive for August, 2007

De Roy Kwesi Andrew on Western Luddism

Posted by rantingkraut on August 30, 2007

“The denunciation of material comfort is so widespread in the West that even schoolchildren seem to think affluence is an evil. (…) If Westerners are not happy with such great things, perhaps they should swap with us Africans. We would love to have what these people seem to hate. You see, we believe in the material progress of mankind; the vast majority of Ghanaians I spoke to while making Damned by Debt Relief said they want more from life: more goods, more products, more choice. We hate being constantly subdued by nature; we are tired of dying early; we are tired of sleeping in mud huts; we are tired of walking long distances for water, food and fuel; we are tired of doing our washing by hand; we are tired of farming with hoes and cutlasses and waiting for nature to be merciful unto us. You think this way of life is ‘natural’ and happiness-inducing? Then you should try it out.” (source)

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Posted in Development, Globalization | 1 Comment »

Criminalising Stupidity

Posted by rantingkraut on August 29, 2007

Udo Voigt, leader of Germany’s thinly disguised neo-Nazi party NPD is facing charges for suggesting Hitler’s deputy Rudolf Heß for the Nobel peace prize.

Germany’s equivalent of Nick Griffin is undoubtedly a politically unpleasant character and this is undoubtedly a very stupid idea. Aside from being Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Civil Liberties, Crazy Krauts, Freedom of Speech | Comments Off on Criminalising Stupidity

Did Paxman really mean this?

Posted by rantingkraut on August 25, 2007

In his recent MacTaggart lecture, Jeremy Paxman raised a highly pertinent question:

The idea of a tax on the ownership of a television belongs in the 1950’s. Why not tax people for owning a washing machine to fund the manufacture of Persil?” (source)

That almost sounds like a rejection of the license fee racket. Did Paxman mean it? Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in In The News, quotes, Regulation | Comments Off on Did Paxman really mean this?

Those Recycling Schemes Again

Posted by rantingkraut on August 22, 2007


The BBC reports that a majority of respondents to a survey supports ‘pay as you throw’ rubbish charging schemes. If there is a compensating decrease in Council Tax –as suggested in the survey—then this might not be such a bad idea. Landfill space is limited after all.

On a more general note, we should never forget that you can get public support for just about anything if you design your survey accordingly. We should never forget this, because there are some highly entertaining examples to prove the point:

– Penn and Teller famously mustered public support for a ban on water!

– … and then there is this wonderful petition to end women’s suffrage.

Posted in In The News, Regulation | Comments Off on Those Recycling Schemes Again

Fear of Sociology: Freedom of Speech and Anti-Terrorism in Germany

Posted by rantingkraut on August 22, 2007

Firebombing a country’s army is usually seen as more than a lack of good manners. A nascent terrorist organization in Germany –the ‘militante gruppe’- has been doing just that and several of its suspected members have now been arrested. Two of these arrests, however, have sparked international protests from colleagues in the UK and the USA as well as Germany itself. Strange as this may seem, it is an event of which readers in the UK should take note. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Civil Liberties, Crazy Krauts, Freedom of Speech, Justice System | Comments Off on Fear of Sociology: Freedom of Speech and Anti-Terrorism in Germany

Quote of the Day

Posted by rantingkraut on August 17, 2007

The diversity ideologues deserve whatever ill tidings they get. They’re the ones who weren’t willing to persuade the public of diversity’s merits, preferring to turn “diversity” into a political and legal hammer to compel compliance. The conversions were forced conversions. As always, with politics comes pushback. And it never stops.

Daniel Henninger

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Irwin Stelzer on UK Immigration

Posted by rantingkraut on August 15, 2007

The Hudson Institute’s Irwin Stelzer comments on Immigration in today’s telegraph and while he raises some valid issues, he ignores others and seems oblivious to the contradictions and omissions in his argument. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in immigration, In The News, Regulation, UK politics | 1 Comment »

Some details on the Stasi’s shoot to kill order

Posted by rantingkraut on August 13, 2007

A newly discovered ‘shoot to kill’ order for members of East Germany’s secret service has received some international attention and caused some debate in Germany itself. The extent of the attention this discovery receives is a bit odd though, since the basic fact of an order to shoot would-be refugees at the Berlin Wall is nothing new. Der Spiegel supplied the following details [1]: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Civil Liberties, Crazy Krauts, In The News | Comments Off on Some details on the Stasi’s shoot to kill order

Censorship in Action

Posted by rantingkraut on August 8, 2007

Channel 4 is apparently being reported to ofcom for representing radical Muslim preachers out of context. Of course, people can in principle be misquoted and this would indeed be a violation of journalistic standards, so the mere fact that ofcom is looking into such an issue may well be defensible. What is more worrying is that criminal charges were considered in this case, Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Civil Liberties, Freedom of Speech, Islamism | Comments Off on Censorship in Action

Two Books on Islamism

Posted by rantingkraut on August 6, 2007

Two books on Islamism have hit the UK book market this year. One, “The Islamist” by Ed Husain is a biographic account by a former Islamist activist; the other “Rethinking Islamism” by Lord Meghnad Desai is an extended essay, based on arguments in an earlier letter to the Financial Times. With a personal account on the one hand and a more detached, academic approach on the other, both titles could well complement each other. Yet, one of the two is clearly a more rewarding read. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Books, Islamism | 2 Comments »