The Ranting Kraut

19.3.2006 – 27.9.2010

Archive for the ‘Regulation’ Category

EU Gender Quotas?

Posted by rantingkraut on September 17, 2010

Viviane Reding, the EU ‘Justice’ commissioner threatens to require minimum quotas for the proportion of women in top business positions:

The target should be that by 2015 at least 30 percent of all supervisory board members should be women, and 40 percent by 2020 …” (source)

An odd target in a way, since English speaking countries, at least, tend not to have supervisory boards. It is also worth noting that supervisory boards have little to do with the day to day running of a business. They are an ideal target if you want to hand out favours without demanding competence.

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Posted in discrimination, EU, In The News, misandry, Regulation, Socialism | Comments Off on EU Gender Quotas?

Tories to keep equality act

Posted by rantingkraut on July 3, 2010

This item briefly made the online headlines: The Tories are planning to press ahead with Harriet Harman’s equality bill requiring, among other measures, ‘gender pay audits’.

CBI director Katja Hall is quoted as saying: “Forcing companies to publish average salary figures for men and women could mislead people into thinking that women are paid less than men in the same role, which is rightly illegal, when differences will actually reflect the proportions of men and women in higher-paid jobs” (source)

Also of interest: Should we mind the Gap? from the iea for download here: pdf.

Posted in discrimination, In The News, Regulation, UK politics | Comments Off on Tories to keep equality act

Performance Targets and the Police

Posted by rantingkraut on May 3, 2010

The Scottish police seem to have noticed that target driven policing causes the police to focus on fulfilling targets rather than serving the public: “Speaking at the Scottish Police Federation annual conference last week she said the performance-related payment system was leading to a “car salesman” style of policing.

She said: “In Strathclyde Police we have senior officers refusing competency-related threshold payments and special payment applications as officers have not met the performance indicator targets set for anti-social behaviour fixed penalty notices, stop searches and other fixed penalty notices.” (source)

Apparently, things aren’t better in England either. One can only hope that the supposedly planned ‘bonfire of labour laws‘ will address this issue after a change in government.

Posted in Civil Liberties, In The News, Regulation, UK politics | Comments Off on Performance Targets and the Police

Banning the ‘Burka’: a poor performance from UKIP

Posted by rantingkraut on January 17, 2010

Nigel Farage appeared on the BBC arguing that face covering Muslim dress should be banned on security grounds -which seemed uncontroversial- and because it is a symbol of the oppression of women and of a divided society. On the two latter points he lost the argument to his Respect opponent.

To argue that women who choose to wear burka or niqab are as a rule oppressed -even if they say otherwise- is essentially a feminist argument which requires hefty dose of social determinism to conclude that women can’t make genuine choices within a patriarchal society.

Alternatively, one could argue that the Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Atheism, Civil Liberties, immigration, Islamism, Libertarianism, monthly rant, Regulation, Religion | Tagged: , , | 2 Comments »

Carbon Tax as Insurance?

Posted by rantingkraut on December 30, 2009

Fareed Zakaria has suggested that “Carbon Taxing” and cap and trade arrangements should be understood as insurance against the costs of climate change. By Zakaria’s argument, you pay a small charge now to insure yourself against the larger cost of climate change.

The argument correctly identifies the equivalent to an insurance contribution. What about the payout? Maybe Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Global Warming, In The News, Regulation | Comments Off on Carbon Tax as Insurance?

Cameron on Personal Freedom

Posted by rantingkraut on June 28, 2009

We’ll start by putting back in place the protections of personal freedom that Labour have taken away.

So we will make some important changes. The next Conservative government will revoke the unjustified and unreasonable powers that let people enter your home without your permission.

We will change the law that allows councils to snoop on people for trivial matters.

We will review the use of the Terrorism Act’s Section 44, and the stop and search powers contained within it.

We will change the Criminal Justice Act 2003 to strengthen the right to trial by jury.

And we will review the operation of the Extradition Act – and the US/UK extradition treaty – to make sure it is even-handed and works both ways.” (Source)

Let’s remember that and remind him when the time comes …

Posted in Civil Liberties, quotes, Regulation, UK politics | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

The Great Depression that didn’t happen

Posted by rantingkraut on June 14, 2009

From David Friedman:

We can learn a little more by looking at a different Great Depression—the one that didn’t happen. From 1920 to 1921, the consumer price index fell by 10.8%, more than in any year of the Great Depression; it fell another 2.3% in the next year. Unemployment rose to about its 1931 level. Looking just at that data, it’s obviously the start of a depression.” (Source)

Posted in Regulation | Tagged: , , | Comments Off on The Great Depression that didn’t happen

Communitarianism, Obama and The Economist

Posted by rantingkraut on April 23, 2009

The Economist’s Lexington column  discusses ‘Obama hatred‘ and turns out to be summarily dismissive of Obama’s critics (see also here). Obama is arguably the USA’s first outspokenly communitarian president, so concern over this new brand of collectivism hardly belongs on the lunatic fringe.
One of the articles The Economist shruggs off is Quin Hillyer’s essay in the American Spectator titled “Il Duce, Redux?“. It makes some points similar to the ones this blog made about New Labour a while ago. Some arguments in this piece are indeed debatable: Obama’s economic interventionism, for example, can just as plausibly be attributed to a desparate attempt at fighting off depression as to an ideologically driven desire to rule the economy. Other points are harder to dismiss:
Again and again, Obama has called not just for a change of policies, but to “change America” or Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Civil Liberties, monthly rant, quotes, Regulation, Socialism | Tagged: , , | Comments Off on Communitarianism, Obama and The Economist

Boris Talks Sense on Trade and the G20

Posted by rantingkraut on March 24, 2009

“… the near-collapse of the banking system, and the shortage of credit, has encouraged the big Western financial institutions to turn their backs on the developing world. Money is being sluiced back home, to Europe and America, with catastrophic consequences for anyone who wants to get a loan in, say, Nigeria. In these circumstances, it is doubly immoral and disgusting that we continue to restrict the access of the developing world to our markets, and that we continue to use huge sums of taxpayers’ money to dump our products on the Third World.” (source)

Posted in Development, Globalization, quotes, Regulation, Socialism | Comments Off on Boris Talks Sense on Trade and the G20

New Labour and the End of Innocence

Posted by rantingkraut on January 5, 2009

Philip Johnston has some fitting comments on Labour’s decade of legislative diarrhoea:

We know there has been a tidal wave of legislation, but it is mind-boggling to discover the size of the tsunami. It is estimated that more than 3,600 new offences have been created. But even more astonishing, as Baroness Stern, a crossbench peer, discovered when she asked, is the number of these that can result in a prison sentence. Believe it or not, there are 1,036 that the official could identify. There may well be more.

It is now an imprisonable offence to allow an unlicensed concert to take place in a church hall. You can go to prison Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Civil Liberties, quotes, Regulation, UK politics | Comments Off on New Labour and the End of Innocence